Moose Hunting Gear Review – DIY Alaska Moose Hunting

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Team Work Makes the Dream Work

On the first day heading into moose camp we experienced strong head winds with a mean rain. We used a 24ft 84inch wide Willie open bow boat sporting a 250 Honda prop driven outboard. These are phenomenal guide boats, almost unbeatable. A perfect vessel for the Yukon river hauling fuel, gear, moose meat, and passengers safely home. What I usually do is keep one dry layer like a vest and quick drying pants in a dry proof bag with my sleeping bag. This layer never ever gets wet. Ever. However, in driving rains on the verge of being snow, ripping a 16foot open bow inflatable for 8hrs straight from base camp…. in head winds going up the Yukon River, just about every layer you got is a necessity. The Ghar jacket goes on first, then the Cirius vest, then the soft shell Dalibor, sealed in nicely with the Koldo. The schoeler fabric on the interior of the Koldo is the star player.

AK-X

Koldo rain shell, ghar insulated jacket, cirius vest, Dalibor jacket in Khaki, and Briareos Gloves.  Winchester Repeating Arms Model 70 Extreme Weather Stainless Steel and Winchester Ammunition Expedition Big Game Long Range. Vortex Optics Scopes and Fury Binos. Spartan Precision Tripods. This was my combo of choice for our 2020 moose hunt on the Yukon River with AK-X. Bringing gear not personally tested on any hunt can be a detriment to the success experienced afield. I’ve used all sorts of gear over the years and have found select garments will usually work when layered correctly. Rain shell, soft shell, and an insulation layer like a down jacket will get you through most hunts.  Keeping the under layers dry and or making sure they are fast drying is imperative.

Hard Work

Once at base camp, I inflated my raft and threw a 20HP Honda prop outboard on the transome. Point of the boat story is, I was in the weather from sun up to sun down. Not like we could see the sun through the rain clouds anyhow. I rocked the Koldo for days in hard core rain. To my amazement, I was bone dry throughout the adventure.

The “Ninja Turtle” gloves as I call them, Briareos gloves kept my hands dry and warm in driving rains, ripping a tiller on the “Orange Crush” 16FT inflatable in all weather conditions. On a few glorious days, we experienced some unreal beautiful weather during the peak rut. I stripped down to my Dalibor jacket and chest waiters to charge through swamps. The joke in camp was that I had a moose string on my back and bulls just kept coming to my calls. My theory was the Khaki Dalibor made me a live decoy.

Talley SS Scope Ringshttps://www.talleymanufacturing.com

The firearm calibers we used on this adventure were 300WM & 30-06 Springfield. The Firearms of choice were the Winchester XPR and Model 70 Extreme Weather Stainless Steel. The ammunition of choice across the board was Expedition Big Game Long Range 190gr. Sure helps heated situations if everyone in camp is using the same ammunition! Fortunately the knockdown power was immense and nothing got too western out there. Having the Spartan Precision Shooting system on board was a bonus for those tall grass big swamp long range shot situations, and being able to film from the Titan Tripod as well. Multiple uses from a versatile tripod.

Hammer Time

The optics of choice were Vortex, a Razor HD LHT 3-15X50, Viper 4-16x 44, Viper 2.5-10X44, and Fury binos. They all worked well together.

Three and half days of travel, three and a half days of hunting, three and a half days travel back home, two and a half days of meat care back home; resulted in 5 bull moose that dreams are made of.  The gear performed as advertised, flawlessly in adverse conditions. For more information on DIY Moose hunting in Alaska and transportation to world class DIY moose hunting check out https://ak-x.com/

Winchester’s Expedition Big Game & EXBGLR

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“One Round. One Rifle. One Alaska Hunting Season.” I set out with Winchester’s 300WSM XPR and Expedition Big Game Long Range across Alaska over the 2017-2018 hunting season. Moose, Sheep, Mountain Goat, Blacktail Deer, Black Bear, and Caribou all fall to this lethal combination. Alaska tested, Alaska tough. Here’s a link to my review on Winchester’s Expedition Big Game and EXBGLR ammunition. ->READ MORE

Expedition Big Game Long Range Put to the Test in Alaska

https://winchester.com/Blog/2019/05/Expedition-Big-Game-Long-Range-Put-to-the-Test-in-Alaska

“Addicted to the Ascent” Presented by Winchester

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Late season mountain goat hunting is a dangerous endeavor. Wind blown knife ridges attract the hardest of critters, high risk…high reward. Why are we drawn towards risky behaviors? In some circumstances they can be healthy, well sort of. On this adventure, Austin and Brian climb towards the goal of notching a late season goat tag.

2016 Alaska Dall Sheep Hunt “Mountain Memories”

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Follow along with team members and brothers Austin & Auggie as they go after Dall Sheep in Alaska’s rugged backcountry.

 

Alaska Video: Alaska Is All About the Adventure

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This is what Mission Alaska is all about…. THE ADVENTURE! Created by Premier Frontier Productions this video footage was compiled from adventures across the entire state. For more information check out http://www.premierfrontierproductions.com. Ever dreamed of exploring this beautiful place? This video gives a great sense of the raw beauty and rugged terrain this state is known for.

Thanks for the great music Noble Firs, “Night Driving” rocks the forests in this video. (From the Album Rockoon)
Special gear thanks to Pretty Fly for a White Guy, Barney’s Sports Chalet, Alpacka Raft, and Campbell Cameras.
Mission Alaska

Bridger Van Ness of Mission Alaska Graduates Ranger School

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Becoming a Airborne Ranger in the United States Army is a very difficult task, Ranger School is an intense 61-day combat leadership course geared to train some of the most elite soldiers America has to offer. Having two brothers who have completed the program (Auggie M. and Dan S.), they have told me first hand just how difficult this accomplishment was. Another one of my hunting brothers named Bridger Van Ness fell off the grid about eight months ago and resurfaced a new man. Bridger Van Ness and I go way back, back to the days of high school and Varsity soccer at Colony High School. Bridger started as a freshman and was a talented athlete to say the least. We have been longtime friends and partners working on the Mission Alaska Project since 2011.  I wanted to congratulate him on his Ranger School success and thank him and all of our troops for supporting and protecting our freedoms as United States citizens. A certifiable “bad boy” in the United States Army, Bridger completed his Ranger school recently and was featured in a story found at The Bayonet and Saber. Bridger has made headlines with this accomplishment as he has pioneered a new pilot program for entry into the prestigious Ranger School. Check out the story below to find out the scoop on Bridger and how his accomplishment has laid the foundation for an improved Ranger Program. Congratulations Bridger, I am very proud to know you and honored to call you friend, brother, and most importantly my hunting buddy. Can’t wait till our next Alaskan adventure!

 

Bridgers harvest 2013 MOOSE

Bridger On Assingment for Team Mission Alaska

Pilot program produces 1st Ranger grad

When Spc. Bridger Van Ness asked his mother to pin his Ranger tab during his graduation ceremony Friday, it signified the beginning of a new career and possibilities for future Infantry Soldiers to enter Ranger School through a new training initiative.

Van Ness, of Wasilla, Alaska, was the first Soldier to go from one station unit training to Ranger School, a feat he said was a challenging and rewarding experience.

“It feels surreal,” he said. “I wanted to do this because of the training and to do missions that every Soldier wants to accomplish.”

“Our brigade combat teams are only manned at 20 percent of all the Ranger requirements and the greatest shortage on Ranger requirements is at the sergeant level and below,” he said. “That has been an issue since the war started in 2001 and something we’ve been trying to address to mitigate the requirement and the need.”

The program will allow Van Ness and future Soldiers to select the duty stations of their choice throughout the Army wherever there is a brigade combat team, Butler said.

“He set a very high bar, so hopefully he will be able to motivate some of his peers when he shows up and tells them the only formal training he had was one station unit training,” he said. It’s challenging, but it is something that anyone can do if they put their mind to it.”

Van Ness, 23, graduated from Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., in May 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. He joined the Army on Oct. 1 and completed one station unit training in January. During his training, Van Ness was approached to be a test subject for the pilot program.

“As he went through OSUT, his chain of command identified stellar performers’ abilities to accomplish the task based on physical fitness and their intellectual capability and maturity,” Butler said. “He was a star performer and exceeded all of the course standards.”

Van Ness said he was sent to pre-Ranger School after completing basic training, which helped him to make it through the Ranger School on the first try.

“I thought that I would possibly have to do another phase over but I made it straight through with the help of great peers and training,” he said. “I hope it’s a big step for the Army in getting this program approved.”

Butler said the 198th Infantry Brigade will continue to identify individuals who exceed course standards and show maturity and the physical and intellectual capacities to complete Ranger School. Using Van Ness’ experience will also help to identify potential challenges Soldiers may face.

“Not everyone is going to be able to come right off the street, join the Army, finish OSUT and go right into the Ranger course, so you have to select the right individuals to succeed,” Butler said. “If we can identify five guys per company that’s great and even better if we have more. We want to get Rangers out to the brigade combat teams so they can adhere to standards and set a great example for their peers. We want to set as many people up for success as possible.”

Preparing for his next duty station in Italy, Van Ness said he hopes to advance his education and use his knowledge from Ranger School to train future Soldiers and help improve the program.

“If a young Soldier has the right mindset, he could definitely accomplish this,” Van Ness said. “I think the Army has the potential to make this program a big hit … it could be a huge success.”