Wild Boar Breakfast Sausage

Butchering, DIY hunting, game processing, hog hunting, meat, nature, wild game

There is a explosive wild pig epidemic attacking the United States. Due to wild pigs adaptability and high reproduction rates, they have now been seen in 47 states and their numbers keep growing. Wild pigs devour crops, uproot pastures, destroy wildlife habitats, spread disease to humans and animals, kill trees and even knock over cemetery stones. Hunters play a big part in monitoring and helping to control wild pig numbers. Wild pigs also give DIY hunters great opportunities to hunt. Wild pigs are in a lot of states and are a main concern for land owners. Most states have unlimited seasons and tags are cheap. Polite and respectful hunters can have great success asking a local land owner if they can harvest a pig from thier land. Most people will say yes and go out of their way to make you successful. Two years ago, I hunted hogs in the Louisiana and they tasted great. There are not a lot of wild pigs up north and I have been craving wild pork ever since.

Austin recently harvested some Hawaiian Jungle Bacon, with his longbow, and was generous enough to give me 4 pounds of the wild pork. When Austin gave me the meat, I immediately had the idea to try making breakfast sausage. I am a big “breakfast person” and love sausage, egg, and cheese sandwiches as well as my favorite, biscuits and gravy.

Jungle bacon from Austin's harvest.

Wild Hawaiian Pork

What sets sausage appart is mainly the spices and seasonings. I looked at some recipes online and ultimately made my own combination of my favorite spices. I also took advantage of some donated fresh sage and rosemary from friends. I chose to go with brown sugar, rubbed sage, salt, rosemary, pepper, red pepper flakes, garlic powder, and chilly powder.

Breakfast Sausage Seasonings

Breakfast Sausage Seasonings

Once we got the meat cubed and the seasonings measured out, we combined both together and were ready to start grinding. You dont have to have or spend a ton of money on a fancy grinder to make your own burger and sausage. I bought this old school, hand crank, meat grinder for $20 and have used it for 3 years now and it has handled all sorts of wild game creations.

Grinding Sausage

Grinding Sausage

The key to sausage to to finely grind it and to grind the seasoning into the meat. I started grinding with the large opening plate, then switched to the smaller, more course, grinding plate. We ground the 4 lbs of pork 4 times to achieve desired consistency.

Ground Wild Sausage

Ground Wild Sausage

Once we ground it all up, it was time to test the seasoning. We made two small patties and fried them up to test the seasoning balance. They tasted great and we didn’t have to change anything.

Wild Boar Sausages

Wild Boar Sausages

I believe more people need to look to the wild pigs as a food source and learn how to harvest them. They are everywhere and make great table fare! By harvesting wild pigs, we can help control numbers and feed our families great meat.

 

-Jon Dykes

@realjondykes

How Do I Gain Hunting Permission: Access to Private Land

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How Do I Gain Hunting Permission: Access to Private Land

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photo courtesy of blog.timesunion.com 

So, these are questions that I am asked almost daily.  How do I gain hunting permission?  I have my hunter safety and hunting license, but I have no where to hunt.   How do I gain access to posted or private land?   I lost my favorite hunting location to posted signs… What do I do?

These questions are simply answered by making a phone call.   In order to gain hunting access or access to grounds you would like to hunt in the future you must first obtain the land owners permission.  Ideally you have verbal and written permission before you attempt to access any private grounds, even if you are recovering a downed animal.   Asking first is always the right thing to do, even if it is very inconvenient.  

The first step is to politely call or knock on an individuals door who owns the property you are trying to access.   Land owners are more reluctant to give permission these days as they are liable for any person who enters their property, meaning they are at risk every time anyone steps onto their property.  Many times the lands owners are very friendly and are more than willing to allow you to hunt on their land, that being said it is always a great idea to be a good steward of the land.  If someone does give you access to their land, in order to gain future access you must establish a working friendship and relationship with this owner.   How to do this is simple, offer your free time to them to help with any chores they may have outside of “hunting season”.  This means donating your time to help mow grass, bail hay, fertilize fields, spread pesticide, plant tree fertilizer spikes,  dig trenches, put in water bars, plant seeds, etc, etc.   Land owners put so many hours into growing wild game populations, it is always good to see the hunters are more into the process than simply showing up on opening morning and expecting to hunt for free.  Hunting for free is a relative term, and trust me there is no free lunches here.   

If you respect a landowner and dedicate your time to helping their property, you will find yourself with more hunting access than you know what to do with.   If a property owner says “no”, then politely offer to come and be a “free” set of hands to help in the off season.   If they turn down free work hours, then move onto the next chunk of property.   Gaining access to land is simple, it all starts with building a trusting relationship with the land owner.  Remember its not always about the kill, its the process that defines the hunting experience and what we strive for as hunters.   If you don’t know where your going to hunt for your upcoming fall season, start asking land owners now and dedicate a few free hours to helping them out.

-Mission Alaska

Mission?  Gain hunting access to private property never hunted before.

-What’s your mission?